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Painting is the means by which I deal with, work through and unload myself of issues that I cannot address otherwise. I have expressed this need as far back as I can remember, and whenever I was unable to paint or draw, I would sculpt with wood, stone, lead or clay. Rilke once said in his letters to a young poet that the most profound things take place in a realm beyond words. It is the process of painting that I find most important. The only guided training I received was during the last three years of school where one of my majors was art. Since then, my education consisted of studying paintings, especially the work of Hieronymus Bosch, Hans Baldung Grien, El Greco, Lucian Freud, Francis Bacon, Edward Hopper, and Otto Dix.

From my childhood on I have been drawing and, later, painting. Although for years my artistic activities have been placed on the back burner due to economical circumstances, children and illnesses, I have always done something to fulfill the need to create, even if it was only late at night at the kitchen table. When there was no possibility to paint, I worked with clay, made small lead sculptures, built stained glass windows.

I have occupied several different spaces as studios--from a room in my family apartment or house, to two years in a loft on the lower east side in Manhattan. But from 1992 until present, a large barn attached to an old farmhouse in Kingfield, Maine is now a studio/gallery, showing besides my own painting the work of other contemporary American artists. Also, in 1996, the Amos Eno Gallery in New York offered me a membership, and I have been showing my work there regularly.

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